Preparing for the August 2017 Total Solar Eclipse

On Monday, Aug. 21, 2017, a total eclipse will cross the entire country, coast-to-coast, for the first time since 1918. Weather permitting, the entire continent will have the opportunity to view an eclipse as the moon passes in front of the sun, casting a shadow on Earth’s surface. And plans for this once-in-a-lifetime eclipse are underway – scientists are submitting research proposals, NASA is sharing information on safe eclipse viewing with community centers, and citizen science projects are developing.

The total solar eclipse begins near Lincoln City, Oregon, at 10:15 a.m. PDT (1:15 p.m. EDT). Totality ends at 2:48 p.m. EDT near Charleston, South Carolina. The partial eclipse will start earlier and end later, but the total eclipse itself will take about one hour and 40 minutes to cross the country. NASA will fund a host of science projects that will occur during this unique period of time.

This image of the solar corona is a color overlay of the emission from highly ionized iron lines, with white light images added below. Different colors provide unique information about the temperature and composition of solar material in the corona.
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Credits: S. Habbal/M. Druckmüller
 

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